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How to Raise Iron Levels Quickly?

Iron is an important nutrient responsible for the production of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin transports oxygen through the bloodstream via red blood cells.  This allows for regular organ functions and physical activity.

Iron deficiency lowers the production of hemoglobin which in turn transports less oxygen to the bloodstream. B12 and Iron deficiency cause anemia, which can be mild, moderate, or even severe. Mild to moderate anemia may not require hospitalization, but they do disrupt your life by causing fatigue. This leads many to wonder how they can raise iron levels quickly.

Understanding Iron

Before learning how to produce more iron quickly, it’s important to understand its role and the signs to look for indicating a need for increasing iron levels.

Iron is a complex nutrient that requires B12 and vitamin C to properly metabolize in humans. This means that stable iron levels achieved through nutrition require paying attention to other nutrients as well.

Most people can get adequate iron from their diets.  In cases where the diet is not enough, drugs or blood transfusions might be necessary.

However, while too little iron is dangerous, heightened iron levels lead to hemochromatosis.

iron in blood

Understanding Anemia

Low iron levels manifest in fatigue, weakness, and paler skin (than your usual healthy skin tone). At this stage concentration and other regular functions are disrupted. If you find your breathing is labored, and that your lips and fingernails are always blue, it may be the time to see a doctor.

Anemia and low iron levels are linked because a patient with anemia has too few red blood cells or hemoglobin. Raising iron levels can reverse adverse anemic symptoms depending on a patient’s medical history.

There are different types of anemia, though the most common and the one that raising iron levels resolve is Iron Deficiency Anemia.

So, How do I Raise Iron Levels Quickly?

If you determine you have an iron deficiency, there are several things you can do. Depending on the cause of anemia, the first approach should be a change in your diet. Following changes to your nutrition, it may be necessary to get a blood test and pursue further steps.

Diet

In cases of minor anemia, it can take 2-4 weeks to reverse the symptoms of anemia. While most people can get iron through their diets, vegetarians and vegans may have to be more intentional about ensuring they get enough iron and b12 in their diets.

Focus on iron-rich foods such as:

  • Leafy Greens (which are also often rich in Vitamin C)
  • Fortified cereals (look for ones that have B12 and Iron)
  • Apricots
  • Prunes and Raisins
  • Red Meat or Iron enriched meat substitutes
  • Tofu
  • Enriched Rice

Combine these iron-rich foods with peppers, eggs, tomatoes, and beans (or all of the above!) for a meal with iron and necessary B12 and Vitamin C.

Supplements

Oral supplements are a popular way to augment your diet when levels are low. There are traditional oral iron supplements, though they do risk hemochromatosis when taken with increased dietary iron levels. In addition, most of them can cause various side effects in the digestive system, like constipation, diarrhea, and nausea.

Other supplements include ones that affect metabolization. IronCatch supplement is iron-free but increases absorption of dietary iron. This reduces the risk of side effects and hemochromatosis while still raising iron levels quickly.

Appropriate Iron Levels are Required for Daily Function

Whether it’s increasing absorption from your diet, or taking a supplement, it’s important to know your body and see a doctor before pursuing oral supplements or injections.

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What Are the Causes of Poor Absorption of Iron?

“Why are you looking so pale?” – are you tired of being asked this question by whoever you meet these days? It’s time for you to go for a hemoglobin test. The one major reason behind noticeable paleness can be poor absorption of iron by your body.

But worry not! It’s a common condition. Despite making all the healthy lifestyle choices, many people suffer from this disorder, which is known as iron deficiency anemia in medical parlance. If you’re diagnosed with this blood disorder, you will have to undergo proper treatment and need to be careful about your diet to get back to the normal condition. 

Before going into the treatment options, let us tell you about the factors that cause this disorder.

Poor Absorption of Iron by Your Body

  • Malabsorption of iron is one of the major reasons behind iron deficiency anemia. Your body may fail to absorb a sufficient amount of nutrients from your food for several reasons.
  • As for iron, human systems are not made to collect iron directly from the consumed food. Your small intestine plays a vital role in absorbing iron and pumping it into your bloodstream, as Celiac diseases affect the intestine’s ability to take in iron from digested food.
  • Some people have their small intestines removed surgically. For example, in gastric bypass surgery, some parts of the intestine are removed. This interferes with this organ’s iron absorption capacity.
  • The use of medicines used to lower stomach acid for a prolonged period can also affect your body’s ability to absorb iron.
low iron diet

Other Causes

However, low absorption of iron is not the only factor leading to iron deficiency anemia. Here are some of the important reasons.

Low-iron diet

Depending on your age and gender, your body requires a certain amount of iron every day. Your body fulfills these needs from the food you eat. However, if your food contains too little iron content, you will experience an iron deficiency in the long run. Add plenty of leafy green vegetables and iron-rich fruits to your diet. Know about the Top 5 fruits with high iron levels here.

Injuries and blood loss

If your body suddenly loses a lot of blood through accident or other conditions such as peptic ulcer, uterine fibroids, hernia, or colon polyps, you can suffer from iron deficiency anemia. 

Pregnancy

During pregnancy, you are in the need of extra iron to support the growth of the baby. If your system does not get that extra amount of iron from food sources or supplements, you may become iron deficient.

Heavy period

It is common for women who have heavy periods to suffer from iron deficiency.

Treatment

Blood deficiency anemia is a treatable condition. The treatment begins with determining the cause of anemia. Accordingly, the measures are prescribed to prevent further loss of iron. Iron supplements are the traditional method to treat anemia, but their long-term use is not recommended. 

IronCatch, on the other hand, is a breakthrough method, widely used in treating anemia. especially the version caused by poor absorption of iron. This supplement with a proprietary formulation can accelerate iron absorption from your daily diet by up to five times.  And it does that without any side effects. If you are suffering from iron deficiency anemia, try this wonder supplement – it’s safe and effective.

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What Are the 5 Stages of Iron Deficiency Anaemia?

Did you know that 33% of the world’s population suffers from anemia? In 50% of cases, the primary cause is iron deficiency. As you can understand from its name, this condition occurs when a person lacks the required amount of iron in his/her body. From low intake of iron-rich food items to blood loss through menstruation, various factors can cause this nutritional deficiency. The body’s inability to absorb iron is one of the major causes of this disorder.

Iron Deficiency Develops Through Five Stages

From mild to severe, the deficiency progresses step by step and not abruptly. Hence, if you are aware of the specific symptoms of each different phase, it will be possible for you to address the deficiency at the earliest.

Stage One – Depletion of Iron Storage

The early-stage deficiency occurs when your body starts “asking” for more iron than what you consume. A persistent mismatch between demand and supply leads to the depletion of the iron that is stored in the bone marrow.

As the body starts losing its stored iron, it starts absorbing more dietary iron to compensate for this loss.

A lab taste during this stage may show the hemoglobin (Hb) and serum iron to be at a normal level, but the serum ferritin level is expected to fall below a level of less than 20 ng/mL. With this condition leading to sharp compensatory iron absorption, there will be a rise in transferrin level.

At this stage, the body still has enough iron to fight the progressive depletion. Anemia does not set in yet, although the affected person is at risk of developing the same.

Stage Two – Mild Deficiency Sets In

This stage is characterized by a drop in the level of transfer iron or Transferrin. Though the transferrin level rises in the depletion stage,  during the second stage of iron deficiency, transferrin saturation decreases. Hemoglobin level is still not affected but red blood cells start shrinking in size during this stage.

Stage Three – Anemia Develops

Anemia is a condition characterized by an alarmingly low level of hemoglobin. This is the stage when the hemoglobin level starts to decrease rapidly.

Stage Four – Microcytosis and Then Hypochromia Develop.

Microcytosis does not only cause your body to have lesser red blood cells but also the blood cells are smaller in size. On the other hand, due to Hypochromia, the red blood cells start losing oxygen-carrying pigments and the blood starts looking colorless.

Stage Five – Severe Hemoglobin Deficiency

In the last stage of its progression, iron deficiency is at its most severe form, causing hemoglobin to drop drastically. With blood cells becoming fewer, smaller and carrying a smaller number of hemoglobins, this causes severe anemia.

Anemia manifests itself through a variety of symptoms include pallor, extreme fatigue and weakness, loss of energy, lack of interest, nagging headaches, and compromised immunity.

iron deficiency anemia

People often take iron supplements to deal with iron deficiency. They may be helpful in increasing the supply of iron in your body, but not without side effects. What if you could find a solution that is iron-free? IronCatch is a supplement that is free of iron and as a result free of any side effects. Its formula is designed to bolster your body’s capacity to absorb iron from natural food. People who used IronCatch testified to have seen a remarkable improvement in their energy level within two weeks of taking this supplement.

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Iron Deficiency in Athletes – Causes and Treatment

Sportspersons, to us, are synonymous with health and vitality. They are the epitome of energy. On the other hand, iron deficiency, to laymen, is often the taxonomy for a person with poor physical health. Because of this perception, it’s difficult for us to put ‘iron deficiency’ and ‘athletes’ into the same bracket. Even though it’s hard to believe, sportspersons, especially runners, are more susceptible to this deficiency.  According to a study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 50 percent of female endurance athletes are deficient in iron, while for men, this value is estimated at 17 percent. 

Some athletes are particularly susceptible to suffering from an iron deficiency. They include:

  • Female athletes, particularly in the menstruating age group
  • Athletes who are on a purely vegetarian diet
  • Athletes with low energy intake 
  • Adolescent athletes 

Iron deficiency can be a serious threat to the career of an endurance sportsperson. If it remains untreated for a long time, it leads to severe fatigue. Iron-deficient athletes get easily exhausted, and gradually they start losing the motivation to practice harder or perform better. Hence, it’s important to know why athletes suffer from iron deficiency.

What causes iron deficiency in athletes?

When everyone loses iron through sweat, urine, menstruation, and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, for athletes, the rate of loss is much higher. Any high-intensity, high-endurance exercise increases the rate of iron losses by nearly 70%. These physical activities destroy red blood cells, especially in the areas near feet, resulting in a shorter red blood cell life span.

Female athletes are even more susceptible to the iron deficiency than their male counterparts due to their menstrual blood loss.

Insufficient dietary iron intake is another reason for iron deficiency. The human body is not very effective at absorbing dietary iron. Those on a vegetarian or vegan diet are more at risk of becoming iron deficient, as the body is even slower in absorbing non-heme iron found in plants. 

Iron Deficiency in Athletes

Treatment for Iron Deficiency

Fortunately, there are ways to deal with iron deficiency, and all treatment regimens aim at increasing the iron intake into the body. Oral supplements can significantly help you meet the iron deficiency in your body. In more severe cases, intramuscular or intravenous injections are used to provide your body with more iron. On top of all these, iron-deficient athletes are advised to consume iron-fortified products or naturally iron-rich products as part of their daily diet. Thus, dietary enhancement remains the fundamental strategy in iron deficiency treatment.

How About Embracing an All-Natural Solution?

While ingesting oral supplements is an important first step towards fighting iron deficiency, it has its side effects. At IronCatch, we have innovated a side-effect-free supplement that is better tolerated than any standard variety. Composed of all-natural ingredients like fish oligosaccharides, vitamins, and minerals, our gluten-free formulation provides athletes with a reliable way to address their symptoms at the root. IronCatch happens to be the first iron-free formulation to deal with iron deficiency. This food supplement can elevate the iron levels in the body by increasing the absorption of dietary iron by at least 3-5 times. It also profoundly increases the absorption rate of this metal from everyday food consumption.

Get in touch with our consultants to know more about our clinically proven supplements because no disease should hinder your goals.

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How Your Skin Can Show the Signs of Iron Deficiency Anemia

Iron deficiency anemia has a wide range of symptoms, including tiredness and fatigue. There are also many symptoms that you can identify visually on your skin that can indicate low iron and iron deficiency anemia.

Unexplained and Long-Lasting Bruises

Bruises are the result of damage to the capillaries, the minuscule blood vessels that distribute nutrients under the skin. When these become damaged due to pressure or a sudden impact, some blood escapes into the tissue and can be seen as a purplish blotch, a bruise. Iron deficiency anemia could be what’s behind frequent bruises or a lower threshold for bruising.

Without sufficient iron, your body can’t keep up with the demand for hemoglobin. This leads to less healthy blood cells and a loss of strength within the capillaries. They’ll break more quickly and take longer to heal. This means you’ll bruise more easily and find bruises lasting longer.

Rashes Associated With Anemia

When most people say “anemia rash,” they’re referring to the purple or red spots that appear in cases of aplastic anemia. This type of anemia is a severe condition caused by problems with the patient’s bone marrow. There is a reduction in red blood cells, but not due to a lack of iron as in iron deficiency anemia.

Having been said that, you can still develop a rash from iron deficiency anemia. Those suffering from low iron often develop itchy skin, which they scratch and can eventually leave their skin red or swollen. You could also have a very severe rash if you take ferrous sulfate drugs for iron deficiency anemia and turn out to be allergic.

low iron

Paleness Due to Low Iron

Paleness is one of the most well-known symptoms of iron deficiency anemia. It goes hand in hand with the general fatigue that many feel when suffering from low iron. The cause here is quite simple. Iron deficiency anemia means that your body can’t make the red blood cells that make your blood red. Without them, your skin loses much of its red hue and appears paler.

This paleness can be recognized almost anywhere, although most will see it in the face first. A more careful assessment can involve looking at the gums, fingernails, or the inside of the eyelids. All of these areas will also become paler in cases of iron deficiency anemia and can distinguish it from other common causes of paleness.

Managing Your Iron Deficiency Anemia

There are a few different ways to address iron deficiency anemia. It could be that your diet simply doesn’t have enough iron, and adding some iron-rich foods could be enough. You might consider a supplement like ferrous sulfate, but you risk side effects like the previously mentioned allergic reactions.

For the best results, you can try an all-natural solution. IronCatch works to increase your body’s natural iron absorption with oligosaccharides and vitamins. IronCatch is gluten-free and suitable for anyone, delivering an effective and safe solution for iron deficiency anemia.

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Top 5 fruits with high iron levels

Low levels of iron in the bloodstream, also known by its medical term as anemia, can cause serious health problems. Iron deficiency symptoms may include weakness, loss of skin tone and headaches. Higher iron deficiencies can bring about more severe symptoms, like shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness, and heart arrhythmia. It is necessary then to take steps to raise the iron levels in the blood. 

When iron deficiency is detected in the body, there are plenty of remedies to cure it. Although many patients seek out medical help, others prefer to take a more natural approach and consume foods with high iron levels.

There is a great variety of foods out there that can help raise iron levels in your body, but if you prefer fruit, this article can direct you to a few with high iron levels.

How do I raise my iron levels?

If you notice iron deficiency symptoms in your body or your doctor determines you suffer from anemia, you should increase the consumption of fruits with high iron levels. This is a very natural way of supplying your body with the much-needed mineral. A pharmacist or a nutritionist at your local supermarket should be able to point you to the right produce. Read more about how to raise iron levels here.

5 Fruits with High Iron Levels

Although iron is a common mineral in the vegetable and fruit world, some fruits carry higher iron levels and, as a result, would be better to palliate iron deficiency symptoms. Here is a list of the top 5 fruits with high iron levels. There are many other fruits with high iron levels, but the ones listed here are considered to bring in the highest levels of iron daily value intake per serving.

passion fruit with high iron levels

1.     Apricot

Apricots, originally from Asia but widely cultivated in warm and dry climates today, are considered to contribute up to 42% daily value of iron per cup serving.

2.     Raspberries

Raspberries, which you can grow in your garden, is another popular fruit that can bring up to 9% daily value of iron content per cup serving.

3.     Blackberries

Also, in the berries family, blackberries can help with 7% of iron Daily Value.

4.     Passionfruit

Passionfruit, also known by its Spanish name of granadilla, can bring in a whopping 21% daily value of iron intake.

5.     Coconut

Dried coconut can also be included in this list and can provide up to a 7% daily value of iron.

IronCatch Supplement

Some people may suffer from low iron absorption, and raising iron levels for them might be difficult. When trying to increase your iron levels, consuming fruits that are high in iron should be done in combination with some supplements to help iron absorption.

IronCatch is regarded as the first supplement in the world to improve iron absorption without causing the side effects of most other related supplements. IronCatch can help raise iron levels considerably within the first thirty days of incorporating it into your diet. It is suitable for everybody – from 1-year-old children to adults in all age ranges. IronCatch is the first clinically approved supplement in the world for improving iron absorption!

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Iron Deficiency and Hair Loss – What Are My Treatment Options?

It isn’t always easy to pin down precisely what the cause of hair loss is. Male-pattern baldness is widespread, and many other factors can lead to hair loss in men, women, and children. There is a link between iron deficiency and hair loss, with hair loss being one of the less common iron deficiency symptoms. Those suffering from other signs of low iron like fatigue and weakness could find that their hair loss is caused by the same condition.

The Link Between Iron Deficiency and Hair Loss

Iron is critical to how the body moves oxygen through the blood. Hemoglobin is the protein that carries oxygen, and it contains iron. When the body has reduced hemoglobin, it has reduced oxygen-carrying capacity. In order to maintain health during these conditions, the body prioritizes blood flow to vital organs. Hair follicles are not a vital organ, and the restricted blood flow reduces their ability to function.

Without healthy follicles, hair begins to fall out. Generally, this type of hair loss is most prominent in women. Natural hair loss is far more common in men than the link between iron deficiency and hair loss. Women are also much more regularly affected by low iron. Some of the other symptoms of low iron include paleness, shortness of breath, brittle nails, and fatigue.

Low Iron and Ferritin

Low iron can also lead to hair loss through ferritin deficiency. While many are already aware of the link between low iron and hemoglobin, ferritin is a less known protein. It stores iron in a readily usable form, rather than it going to waste. Hair follicles contain high levels of ferritin, and it is believed that the body appropriates this ferritin for other uses when levels are low.

Ferritin deficiency is common after major blood loss, during pregnancy, and in patients with hypothyroidism or celiac disease. Hypothyroidism itself is commonly attributed as a cause for hair loss, but low ferritin could be the actual cause in these cases. Much like cases of reduced hemoglobin, low ferritin levels can be remedied by addressing the root cause of low iron levels.

low iron hair loss treatment

Treatment for Low Iron Hair Loss

Increasing iron levels to reduce hair loss can be tackled through various methods. Direct iron supplements containing additional iron can raise iron levels. However, they carry numerous side effects and aren’t suitable in cases where reduced absorption is the problem.

There are many foods that can help improve iron absorption, helping the body make use of available dietary iron. Vitamin C is one of the most important nutrients for absorption, so increasing consumption can help. Avoiding calcium-rich foods like dairy at mealtimes can also increase iron absorption, as there is less mineral competition.

An All-Natural Solution

Anyone who wants to avoid side effects or can’t take traditional supplements could benefit from a supplement that increases absorption. IronCatch is the only supplement on the market designed specifically for increased iron absorption. The all-natural formulation of fish oligosaccharides, vitamins, and minerals is gluten-free and safe for those with celiac disease. IronCatch provides a safe and natural way for those with low iron to address their symptoms at the source. IronCatch suits many demographics, including both men and women of different ages, and its efficacy is clinically proven!

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Low Iron In Pregnancy: Symptoms and Treatment

Developing iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy can lead to a number of severe complications for both the baby and the mother. There is an increased risk of low birth weight for the baby and a chance of premature delivery. Low iron in pregnancy symptoms leads to reduced muscle function, making physical exertion difficult for pregnant women. There are consequences after birth as well, including increased tiredness and a reduction in milk production.

Low Iron in Pregnancy Symptoms

Low iron reduces the body’s ability to effectively transport oxygen due to reduced red blood cell production. This is of particular concern to pregnant women, whose blood supply can increase up to 50 percent during pregnancy. There are a variety of symptoms that can indicate low iron. Increased tiredness is one of the most common low iron in pregnancy symptoms. Further symptoms can include breathlessness and dizziness.

As trying as these symptoms may be during pregnancy, there are more severe iron deficiency symptoms in some cases. Heart palpitations can occur, leading to further complications and distress. Chest pains are another symptom that is cause for serious concern. Iron deficiency can be verified using a blood test that checks hemoglobin levels.

Risk Factors for Iron Deficiency During Pregnancy

Several risk factors can increase a pregnant woman’s chance of developing iron deficiency. Those who have suffered from low iron before pregnancy are at increased risk of developing a more serious deficiency. There are several blood conditions that can contribute to iron deficiency.

Furthermore, gastrointestinal conditions can reduce iron absorption, meaning that the body cannot absorb dietary iron. Risk is also increased in women carrying twins or triplets, women under 20 years of age, and those who have given birth within the previous year.

Risk Factors for Iron Deficiency During Pregnancy

Low Iron Treatment During Pregnancy

Prescribed treatments vary by the term of the pregnancy. If a woman is past 36 weeks, there is significant concern that many treatments will not take effect before the birth. In this case, a doctor will often prescribe an intravenous iron infusion directly into the bloodstream. The patient is monitored for at least half an hour after the procedure.

For women at less than 36 weeks of pregnancy, there are more options. In some cases, it can be appropriate to treat iron deficiency through dietary changes. If a woman’s diet is indeed too low in iron, simply increasing the amount of iron-rich food can help.

Iron supplement tablets are also commonly used. These tablets contain iron in the form of an iron salt, typically ferrous sulfate. This directly increases the amount of iron the patient is consuming. The side effects of iron supplements can include nausea, bloating, and constipation. Alternative iron supplements can contain other salts such as ferrous fumarate or iron bisglycinate. While these alternatives are presented as causing fewer side effects, there is still the chance of developing stomach cramps, loss of appetite, and more severe reactions.

All-Natural Supplements

Instead of a direct iron supplement, pregnant women can benefit from an all-natural supplement that increases iron absorption. This allows the body to use more of the dietary iron already being taken in. Those suffering from low iron in pregnancy symptoms can benefit from using IronCatch, an all-natural supplement containing fish oligosaccharides, vitamins, and minerals. While a doctor should be consulted about iron deficiency during pregnancy, IronCatch can provide increased iron absorption without the side effects of other iron supplements.

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Iron Deficiency Skin Problems – Can Low Iron Levels Cause Anemia Rash?

Different types of anemia can lead to a wide variety of side-effects, including rashes. To verify that the condition is caused by blood deficiency, look for other present symptoms. Pale skin, shortness of breath, and fatigue are all symptoms of anemia. If these coincide with a new breakout, it could very well be an anemia skin condition. Consult a doctor or dermatologist if a severe breakout occurs.

Aplastic Anemia Skin Problems

The most common cause of iron deficiency skin problems is aplastic anemia. This specific type of blood deficiency is rare and often serious. Not only is this condition hereditary, but it can also develop in patients with no family history of the condition. The condition is most widespread in Asia, occurring twice as frequently as elsewhere.

Aplastic anemia is caused by a lack of production of new blood cells. The bone marrow produces these cells. The condition leads to a reduction in both red blood cell and platelet numbers. Without enough platelets, patients are prone to bruising and bleeding. In some cases, the apparent rash is actually just a series of bruises, but this isn’t always what’s happening.

Aplastic Anemia Rash

The rash produced by aplastic anemia is composed of patches of red and purple dots. These dots are called petechiae. The dots can be either flat against the skin or slightly raised. While this skin problem can occur anywhere on the body’s surface, the most commonly affected areas are the neck, legs, and arms. There aren’t any severe symptoms associated directly with the skin condition itself, with no itching or pain occurring.

Can Low Iron Levels Cause Anemia Rash

Iron Deficiency Skin Problems Brought on by Anemia

A blood deficiency rash is one of many iron deficiency symptoms. Patients suffering from iron deficiency anemia are prone to developing iron deficiency skin problems. More often than typical skin problems, iron deficiency anemia leads to significant itching of the skin without any visible effect. While those suffering from this itchiness might scratch their skin enough for it to become red, this is not the same as having a rash.

When iron is low, patients can develop more serious iron deficiency skin problems through the cure rather than the disease. Common treatments like ferrous sulfate can lead to skin problems and conditions. If the patient is allergic to ferrous sulfate, they can develop a severe rash and even hives. Skin swelling is also another possible side-effect. These symptoms can occur in any part of the body.

All-Natural Solution IronCatch Avoids Side-effects

Patients shouldn’t have to choose between treating their blood deficiency and avoid any skin problems. They should be able to do both simultaneously. IronCatch is an all-natural supplement that can increase iron levels to mitigate iron deficiency anemia. The product contains no iron. Instead, it uses a blend of vitamins and minerals to improve iron absorption within the body. This means that there’s no ferrous sulfate to cause nasty breakouts and uncomfortable itching. Get better without incurring unwanted side effects with IronCatch, and an all-natural solution for iron deficiency.

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3 Iron Deficiency Symptoms and Causes

You’ve heard about it before: a lack of iron can cause health problems. But how serious are these health problems, and what are the specific symptoms?

The Basics: What Is Iron Deficiency?

Iron deficiency is when a person lacks the proper amount of iron needed to produce hemoglobin, an essential protein for red blood cell production. Without red blood cells, the body cannot deliver oxygen properly, so an iron deficiency can cause serious problems. People who develop long term iron deficiency become anemic.

Who Suffers from Iron Deficiency Symptoms?

Anyone can become anemic from a lack of iron intake. However, certain subgroups are specifically susceptible to the condition.

Young children develop quickly and require lots of food with high nutritional input. According to the World Health Organization, almost 50% of the world’s children are anemic due to a lack of iron in their diet.

Next, pregnant and childbearing women often suffer symptoms of anemia. They become anemic due to the child’s demands on their blood supply. Pregnant or childbearing women must compensate for the child when planning a diet.

Lastly, people who suffer from chronic illness or blood-related health complications are more likely to suffer from iron deficiency symptoms. These individuals are predisposed to the ailment due to frequent blood loss or other conditions.

low iron symptoms

The Symptoms:

1.     General Fatigue

People suffering from anemia often express a feeling of perpetual exhaustion. This feeling becomes overwhelming when performing everyday tasks or when the individual is completely rested. This exhaustion or weakness is noticeable and causes sufferers to gradually become more sluggish.

In this situation, the brain isn’t receiving enough oxygen to feel awake. Instead, oxygen levels are lower, making the body feel sleepy and causing light-headedness when the body is exerted.

2.     Pale Skin, Cold Hands and Feet

Without normal hemoglobin levels, the body’s blood flow is interrupted. It’s unable to deliver the normal amount of blood that heats and allows the body to function normally. The hands and feet are first to feel cold, as they are the furthest from the heart, which delivers oxygenated blood. People develop pale skin when too little blood is flowing to their heads.

3.     Fast or Irregular Heartbeat

The disruption of hemoglobin will affect cardiovascular activity. Sensing a lack of oxygen in the body, the brain will send messages to the heart to pump more blood to the body. This signaling sends the heart into overdrive so it can provide the body enough oxygenated blood.

What’s the Solution?

Increased iron intake is a start. But many people don’t realize that a lack of Vitamin A in their diet contributes to iron deficiency anemia. Vitamin A increases iron absorption and is key to relieving common symptoms of anemia.

IronCatch is the first all-natural, iron-free solution to improving iron absorption. The treatment is proven to decrease symptoms of anemia and raise overall iron absorption. Iron Catch is the perfect way to decrease symptoms of anemia while increasing overall iron absorption.